Monday, 26 August 2013

DIGITAL TASK CARD

DIGITAL TASK CARD
RATIONALE:
There are different ways to learn a skill:

For example:
·      Simplification – breaking a complex task into simpler steps.
·      Modification – hitting a handball across to a partner transferred to learn hitting with the extended arm for overhead clear.

ANY OTHER EXAMPLES OF LEARNING?

HOW CAN WE IMPROVE THE LEARNING OF A SKILL?

TASK: Each group of players (4 in a group).
Create a simple DIGITAL TASK CARD (DTC).

DIGITAL TASK CARD focus: Drop Shot

Note: There are various Drop Shots
FOREHAND DROP SHOT / BACKHAND DROP SHOT / DROP SHOT AT NET

FORMAT:
1. STUDENT NAMES:
2. NAME OF SKILL:
3. LEARNING POINTS (At least 4 – one point per student)
4. VIDEO / PICTURES (Relevant to learning of the skill)
5. Either:
·      Tactical advantage of learning this skill (at least 4 – one point per student)
·      Modified rules to apply the skill
·      Questions and Answers (at least 4 – one point per student)

RESOURCES:
Badminton: Steps to Success (Tony Grice)
www.usabadminton.org
www.internationalbadminton.org

FURTHER POSSIBILITIES
Other Skills:
1.    CLEAR,
2.    SERVE,
3.    SMASH,
4.    DRIVE,
5.    TACTICS / STRATEGIES
6.    and DOUBLES PLAY

Final Thoughts:
Can you create a DTC for your CCA? For any skill that you wish to learn?

Due Date: Fri, 6 September – SW Reps to remind class for submission on SW Blog.

THANK YOU!
Mr. Patrick Hiap

OVERHEAD DROP SHOT

Badminton Drop Shots
Badminton Drop Shots are delicate badminton shots that can win you points outright if executed well with deception. These shots can be played both on the forehand and backhand sides.

Use the badminton drop shot to move your opponent to the frontcourt. 
It will create space in the midcourt and backcourt for you to exploit.

Wrist action is essential in providing the disguise and element of surprise. The optimum hitting zone is located somewhere above the central area of your racket.

You can play two types of Badminton Drop Shots, Slow Drop Shot and Fast Drop Shot.

slow drop shot shall land in your opponent's frontcourt area, as close to the net as possible. The point of impact is above the racket shoulder. It is intended to move your opponent to the frontcourt, hopefully forcing a weak return to your midcourt for you to kill.



fast drop shot shall land in the front of your opponent's mid court area, preferably to the sides. Hit the shuttle slightly further in front of the body to produce a shallower trajectory at a faster speed. It is intended to catch your opponent off balance and have less time to respond.


Forehand Drop Shot
The forehand overhead drop shot is similar to the action of throwing a ball. If you can throw a ball well, you shouldn't have problem playing it. You can always practice throwing with a shuttle first before stepping on to the court.

Here are some pointers for playing a forehand overhead drop shot.

Adopt the forehand grip.
- Turn your body and stand sideways to the net with your non-racket shoulder facing the net.
- Shift your weight on to your rear foot.
- Bend your elbow and lock your wrist preparing to swing forward.
- Raise your non-racket hand and point at the shuttle to improve timing and balance.
- Contact the shuttle as high as possible and out in front of your body.
- Straighten your elbow as you hit the shuttle.
- Slice or tap the shuttle as you hit it, reducing the speed of the racket head.
- The angle of the racket face will determine the direction of your shot.
- Follow through with your racket and shift your weight from your rear foot to your front foot.
- Move back to your base position.

Backhand Drop Shot
It is not easy to play a backhand overhead drop shot. Even experienced players have problem with this badminton stroke. You shall always try to play an 'around the head' forehand drop shot whenever possible.

However, it is important that you know how to play the backhand overhead drop shot. There are times when you just can't play the shuttle with your forehand.

Here are some pointers for playing a backhand overhead drop shot.

Adopt the backhand grip.
- Turn your body so that your back is facing the net.
- Lead and shift your weight to your racket foot.
- Lift your arm from the shoulder with the forearm parallel to the floor.
- Hold the racket across your body with the racket head pointing down.
- Keep the racket arm and elbow close into your body.
- Contact the shuttle in front of your body and as high as possible.
- Slice or tap the shuttle as you hit it, reducing the speed of the racket head.
- The angle of the racket face will determine the direction of your shot.
- Push your body back to your base position.

Around the Head Drop Shot

This is actually a forehand overhead badminton drop shot played at the non-racket side of your body. Try to use it whenever play permits as a forehand stroke is always better and more accurate than a backhand.
The techniques for hitting this shot are about the same as the forehand overhead stroke with only some minor adjustments.

Here are some pointers for playing a forehand around the head drop shot.

- Stand squarely to the net.
- Bend your upper body sideways to your non-racket side as your arms come through.
- Shift your weight to your non-racket leg.
- Bend your elbow and bring the racket behind your head.
- As you swing forward, your forearm will brush the top of your head before straightening.
- Transfer your body weight rapidly as your non-racket leg pushes your body back to your base position.

An important thing to note here is that whether you are playing a badminton drop shot, a clear or a smash, your wrist plays a key part in creating deception.

The basic preparations for these badminton shots are the same, only the angle of the racket face, the speed of the racket head and the point of impact is different. Keep your opponent guessing.

Remember...Practice is the only way to improve your Badminton Drop Shots...


Source: http://www.badminton-information.com/badminton_drop_shots.html

Tuesday, 9 April 2013

NAPFA videos



Hi All, 

In case you need video's on how to perform NAPFA items:

includes common errors and a bit of humour. Ignore the advertisements =)

Regards,
Mr. Patrick Hiap

Thursday, 28 February 2013

Football: Week 8 Peer Coaching

Hello All,

Peer Coaching segment:
  • Reminder to complete your lesson plan prior to Peer Coaching your group.
  • Brief your group prior to recording the video: briefing includes i) the skill / concept, ii) the key points <at leat 2 to 3>, iii) why do we want to learn this skill / concept, iv) reflections no later than the 3rd day after your coaching segment. 
  • Videographer must consider:
  • Avoid facing the sun. 
  • If audio is unclear, provide voice-over.
  • Elevated video (during drills) or close-up (focus on key points - e.g. kicking using inside of foot, Goalkeeper catching a shot using a with fingers shaped into a 'W'.)
  • Check video to inform coach if the section needs to be recorded again.
  • The video should be about 5 minutes long - <Intro to skill / concept / key points / explaination of drill + actual drill sequence>
Upload your videos with the <Title of Skill / Concept>, <Peer Coach Name>, <Videographer>

Regards,
Mr. Hiap

Saturday, 23 February 2013

Sec 4-07: Football Teams

Hello S4-07, here are the football teams:



Team A
Wen Kai / Norman / Zheng Jie / Shamemi / Wei Huang



Team B
Priyanka / Mohit / Abigail / Mikhael / Gregory

Team C
Aisyah / Naveena / Abu / Issac / Pasakorn / Jeremy




Team D
See To / Mirza / Pranavi / Jurvis / Izzat



Note: The first name (e.g. See To) will start 'Peer Coaching' from Week 8 (25th Feb) onwards.
The second name will be the videographer (e.g. Mirza). See To should also bring his camera as a back-up.

Each coaching session is 15 minutes maximum. Each group will have 1 football per player & 10 cones each.

The Football Coaching Template can be found on the Sec 4 Google site.
Remember to email or pass me the hardcopy when you have completed your post-coaching reflection.


Regards,
Mr. Hiap

Wednesday, 20 February 2013

SST Year 4 Territorial Invasion Games Assessment Rubrics – Football


SST Year 4 Territorial Invasion Games Assessment Rubrics – Football

Criteria / Levels
1. Spatial Awareness
2. Manipulative Skills
3. Game Sense
4. Application
5. Sportsmanship

Level 4 Accomplished
Pupil is able to move into space to receive the ball practically all the time.
Pupil is able to receive, dribble and control the ball all the time.
Pupil is able to correctly decide when to pass, where to pass or who to pass to all the time.
Pupil is able to demonstrate mastery in applying a skill or concept in a training situation.
Pupil shows appropriate behavior and attitude, is able to play the game fairly and according to the rules stipulated at all times.

Level 3
Competent
Pupil is able to move into space to receive the ball most of the times.
Pupil is able to pass accurately and receive the ball successfully most of the times.
Pupil is able to correctly decide when to pass, where to pass or who to pass to most of the time
Pupil is able to demonstrate competence in applying a skill or concept in a training situation.


Pupil shows appropriate behavior and attitude, is able to play the game fairly and according to the rules stipulated most of the times.

Level 2 Developing
Pupil is able to move into space to receive the ball sometimes.
Pupil is able to pass accurately and receive the ball successfully sometimes.
Pupil is able to correctly decide when to pass, where to pass or who to pass to sometimes.
Pupil is able to demonstrate basic application of a skill or concept in a training situation.

Pupil shows appropriate behavior and attitude, is able to play the game fairly and according to the rules stipulated sometimes.

Level 1
Needs Improvement
Pupil does not move into space to receive the ball at all times.
Pupil is unable to pass accurately and receive the ball at all times.
Pupil is unable to correctly decide when to pass, where to pass or who to pass to at all times.
Pupil is unable to demonstrate application of a skill or concept in a training situation.

Pupil shows inappropriate behavior and attitude, is unable to play the game fairly and according to the rules at all times.